PARTICLES+WAVES Kari Lindstrom

“I first started looking at cellular forms some years ago while taking a plant biology class at Brooklyn College. Microscopic sections of plant tissue existed, it seemed to me, as near complete works of art possessing an autonomous elegance and economy of form - what more was needed?  What was it that made these images so engaging?  How might my own practice benefit from looking at these forms in a more rigorous way? With a rudimentary understanding of plant morphology, and after producing a number of studies and prototypes, I began to translate my drawings into various materials: paper, vinyl, tyvek, aluminum, steel, bronze, wood, and later into video and dance/performance art. Laser cutting into rigid materials allows me to more fully explore the fullness and emptiness of negative/positive space, line-mass ratios, the  progression of scale while simultaneously achieving a subtlety of detail and materiality.”

“The etymology of the word Cellae can be traced back from its present day definition as the basic structural unit of all living organisms - to early modern prison rooms - to the ascetic chambers of medieval monks -  and finally to  the innermost sanctum of pre-Christian temples where divine transmissions were thought to occur.  The sculpture in this body of work represents a variety of plant and animal tissues each characterized by a unique form and function. Root Apical Meristem represents an especially potent region of the plant.  Here in a condensed region known as the quiescent center, plant stem cells reproduce themselves. As new cells emerge, the root tip is displaced deeper into the soil thereby lengthening the root.  In Quatro, axial cross sections of the two classes of flowering plants Monocotyldon and Dicotolydons are presented in relation to each other.  Here the cylindrical arrangement of cells transforms across the root-stem axis. Lateral Growth, by contrast, represents secondary growth where differentiated cells multiply to fill in the girth of the plant. Soft Cerebellum represents the part of our brain responsible for coordination and precise movements.  As a dancer I have enjoyed translating the form of the cerebellum into pliable materials so that I can mold, shape and position them in three dimensional space.  Underneath all this is the wish to encourage in myself an open and permeable body-mind.”

BIOGRAPHY

KL 22204
Quatro series: Dicot Stem, 2011
Kari Lindstrom
Blackened ash veneer
20.0"h x 20.0"w x 1.1"d

KL 22203
Quatro Series: Monocot Stem, 2011
Kari Lindstrom
Blackened ash veneer
20.0"h x 20.0"w x 1.1"d

KL 22201
Quatro Series: Dicot Root, 2011
Kari Lindstrom
Blackened ash veneer
20.0"h x 20.0"w

KL 22140
Monocot Root, 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Blackened ash veneer
22.0"h x 22.0"w x 1.1"d

KL 22199
Root Apical Meristem (small), 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Stainless steel
29.0"h x 9.0"w

KL 22193
Root Apical Meristem (small), 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Stainless steel
18.0"h x 11.0"w

KL 22198
Root Apical Meristem (large), 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Corten steel
80.0"h x 44.0"w

KL 22197
Root Apical Meristem (medium), 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Stainless steel
66.0"h x 16.0"w

KL 22196
Root Apical Meristem (medium), 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Stainless steel
40.0"h x 22.0"w

KL 22128
Dicot Stem, 2009
Kari Lindstrom
Stainless steel with chrome finish
20.0"h x 20.0"w x 1.1"d